St. Patrick’s day suprises in pot of gold at the end of the rainbow

Leprechauns were usually the first things that popped up in the mind when one thought about St. Patrick’s Day, but there was more to the holiday.

According to Georgia Public Broadcasting Media, St. Patrick, the founder of this holiday, was born with the name Maewyn. Born into Roman Britain, he was kidnapped into slavery and brought to Ireland, where he lived through years of hard labor.

After escaping from slavery, he traveled to Gaul, France, where he took residence in a monastery. He converted to Christianity and went back to Ireland where he became a missionary.

Though Christianity was followed in Ireland, he confronted the Druids, who despised the Christian faith. Their confrontation ended with the Druids’ pagan rites being abolished, and Christianity being accepted more in Ireland.

St. Patrick became a priest and decided to devote his life to Christianity. After his death, he was deemed a saint, because he helped spread the Christian faith.

Irish born or raised understand the true principles of St. Patrick’s Day. It was told that he was so clever that he used a shamrock, also known as three leaf clovers, to explain the divine trinity.

America has grown to enjoy this holiday, not because it wants to reproduce what the Irish cherish, but because Irish citizens immigrated over to America and brought their traditions with them. For example, the tradition of dyeing of the Chicago River green started in 1962, when city officials decided to dye part of the river green as an ode to the Irish citizens that lived in Chicago.

Along with the Saint Patrick’s Day festivities, the parade continues to be the most anticipated. According to examiner.com, an estimated 400,000 people will be watching the annual St. Patrick’s Day parade in person, in downtown St. Louis this year, which would make 191 parades, since it started.

Although these major parades were anticipated on a larger scale, some students enjoyed the parties they had at home.

Ruben Navarro, seventh grade string major, said, “St. Patrick’s Day parties to me are all about finding the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow in your life.”