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FCC repeals net neutrality

Federal+Communications+Commission+Chairman+Ajit+Varadaraj+Pai+testifies+on+Wednesday%2C+July+19%2C+2017+before+the+U.S.+Senate+Committee+on+Commerce%2C+Science%2C+and+Transportation+on+Capitol+Hill+in+Washington%2C+D.C.+%28Ron+Sachs%2FCNP%2FZuma+Press%2FTNS%29
Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Varadaraj Pai testifies on Wednesday, July 19, 2017 before the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. (Ron Sachs/CNP/Zuma Press/TNS)

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Varadaraj Pai testifies on Wednesday, July 19, 2017 before the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. (Ron Sachs/CNP/Zuma Press/TNS)

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Varadaraj Pai testifies on Wednesday, July 19, 2017 before the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. (Ron Sachs/CNP/Zuma Press/TNS)

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The Federal Communications Chair (FCC) recently voted to end the agency’s policy of net neutrality.

According to The New York Times, the vote, three to two, scrapped the rules on the agency’s previous policy of net neutrality under the Obama Administration.

The rules, enacted in 2015, required Internet Service Providers (ISPs) like Verizon to treat all websites equally. It made it so that ISPs could not speed up some content while slowing down others, or allowing them to force tech companies to pay to have a higher streaming speed.

Another result of the repeal of the rules was that it limited the FCC’s oversight over ISPs, and passed on power to the Federal Trade Commission.

Ajit Pai, the chairman of the FCC, said that the reason they decided to repeal the rules was to increase investment into broadband providers.

However, the repeal will not take immediate effect. It has to be approved by the Office of Management and Budget before it can go into effect, and according to The Hill, it will be a process that will take months.

Two obstacles are blocking the repeal’s pass. Many advocacy groups and state attorney generals are suing the FCC, the matter being decided in the courts.

According to The Washington Post the next obstacle of the repeal of net neutrality will have to go through Congress. Some Senators and Representatives hope to use their power under the Congressional Review Act to block the repeal. Already, Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer said that he would force a vote on the issue.

The vote brought a roar of dissent from the media and net neutrality supporters. For them, it is up to the courts and Congress to decide.

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FCC repeals net neutrality